Skip to Content
© Antonio Guillem | Dreamstime.com
Tech tips

Why your job ad isn’t getting any results

Presented by LinkedIn

Presented by LinkedIn

Visit LinkedIn.com/Kim and, for a limited time, post a job for free.

It’s a good time to be an employer. As COVID-19 restrictions slowly start to lift, the labor market is growing stronger each day. In February, employers filled 379,000 job positions — it was the strongest showing since October.

If you’re looking to attract new talent to your company, there’s no better time to publish a job listing. Professionals are ready to start the new year off with a fresh start, which means savvy employers have a ton of great candidates to choose from. Tap or click here to see which industries job seekers are most interested in.

Then again, your luck may shift depending on your job ad strategies. We found four fatal flaws that could repel candidates from applying to your open positions. If you’re guilty of any of these, we’ve also got some helpful solutions.

1. You’re using the wrong job titles

When you’re writing out a job description to attract new hires, your job title is a golden opportunity. It’s the first impression people get; it’s your chance to grab their eyes and pull them towards your job listing. That means you need to pick something succinct, interesting and — most importantly — accurate.

If you have just one word off in your job title, that could repel the very people you want to attract. You should also keep in mind that different companies or industries may use similar titles to mean different things.

For example, one company may want a consultant with strong sales skills to build client relationships and spend time in the community. But another company may want someone who spends all their time in the office, analyzing data and research.

There are a few different job titles that are so vague they could actually shoot you in the foot. Tap or click here for five job titles you should avoid at all costs.

2. Your post is confusing or includes mistakes

It’s easy to get technical when you’re writing a job description. After all, you want to be thorough, so people know what to expect. But when you get too into the weeds, you could easily confuse candidates.

Try to see your job ad from a new candidate’s perspective. Jobseekers want to get a quick idea of what this job will entail, so ask yourself these questions:

  • What are the responsibilities? Make it easy for people to know what they’ll be doing day in and day out.
  • How much will they get paid? Include some compensation information. After all, that’s the main reason why people are applying. They want to get the best bang for their buck.
  • What status will this job provide? Let people know which role they’ll play in the grand scheme of your company. Will they be managing other people? Who are they directly working under?

One good trick is to write your job description and then put it aside. Do something else for a few hours and then look over it with fresh eyes.

Pretend you’re a job seeker looking for a great new position. What questions would you have if you were looking over the job ad? Then, update your description, so candidates have as many details as possible.

This also helps you spot any mistakes you may have made. There’s nothing worse than finding typos in a job ad you just wrote. That can make you look unprofessional and unappealing to the very people you want to hire!

3. It’s boring

Sure, your job description should include the necessities: tell people how much experience they should have and what their tasks will be. But is that really interesting?

This can be a hard pill to swallow, but many job descriptions are flat-out boring. If you aren’t writing about your open position engagingly, the bright eyes you want in your office may glaze over in boredom and click away to another open position.

Don’t forget that job interviews are a two-way street. Yes, you’ll be analyzing candidates to find the best fit … but you also want to attract them in the first place. If your job description is bare-bones, that won’t make people excited to apply.

When you’re writing about an open position, that’s your chance to sell someone on why they want to do that role at your company. So jazz up your job ads and paint an exciting picture of what people can expect.

Need some concrete tips to get people pumped about your open position? Tap or click here to write more interesting job descriptions.

4. You’re posting in the wrong place

LinkedIn is the perfect place for talent acquisition. With nearly 660 million users in every corner of the globe, it’s the world’s largest professional network with nearly 660 million users in more than 200 countries and territories worldwide. Plus, it’s got tons of built-in networking features to make connections easier than ever before.

If you’re a business owner looking for talented workers, LinkedIn has your back. Once you post your job on the world’s largest professional network, you can get matched with the most qualified candidates in your field.

LinkedIn even lets you know which people would be perfect — even if they haven’t applied yet. Pair that with the direct messaging feature, and you could get in contact with excellent workers in the snap of your fingers. Use the tips in this article, and your job descriptions could attract amazing candidates to your open positions.

Visit LinkedIn.com/Kim and get $50 off your first job post.

Stop robocalls for good with Kim’s eBook

Robocalls interrupt us constantly and scam Americans out of millions of dollars every year. Learn Kim's best tricks for stopping annoying robocalls in this handy guide.

Get the eBook