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Ridiculously simple security settings your IT guy wishes you knew

Ridiculously simple security settings your IT guy wishes you knew
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Do you have an "IT guy" in your life? It could be your son or daughter, or a spouse, friend or other acquaintance. Or it might be a professional IT guy you or your employer pays to help keep your gadgets running.

Whoever it is, it's never a bad thing to make their life easier. That's why today we're going to give you some simple security settings you can turn on that will make you safer, and make less work for them. And if you're the IT guy or IT gal for other people, like many of us here at Komando.com, be sure to send this to the people you take care of so it makes your life a bit easier.

1. Supercharge your passwords

Your password is the first line of defense against hackers trying to break into your online accounts. Unfortunately, complex passwords are annoying to make and hard to remember, which is why many people make ones that are too easy. For the best security, we recommend getting a password manager like KeePass to help you create strong passwords and securely store them.

Even then, it's likely that a hacker is going to get your passwords at some point. Data breaches happen regularly and your username and password for any account might get leaked. Luckily, there's a way to keep hackers out of your account regardless.

It's called two-factor authentication, and behind the fancy name, it just means you need two forms of ID to log in to your account. The first form of ID is your password, and the second is usually a one-time code sent to your cellphone. Even if a hacker has your password, they probably won't also have your phone.

Most major companies now offer two-factor authentication for their online accounts, and it takes just a second to set up. You can even designate secure computers to avoid the inconvenience of logging in with 2FA every time. However, it will still activate when you, or a hacker, tries to log in from an unfamiliar computer or gadget.

Learn how to turn on two-factor authentication for Google, Facebook and other online services you probably use. 

Next page: Stop malicious apps and network snoopers
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