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One big passcode mistake smartphone and tablet owners make

Creating a strong pattern

The first thing to do is use eight or nine nodes in your pattern. A hacker or snoop trying for a quick score won't bother attempting patterns with that many nodes when most people only use four or five.

Even with that many nodes, however, if you spell out a common shape like a letter, or start it in a corner, you're improving the attacker's chance of getting in. You want a pattern that starts in the center or edges and crosses itself several times.

Here's the type of pattern Marte Løge suggests (obviously you shouldn't use this exact pattern, though):

New data uncovers the surprising predictability of Android lock patterns Ars Technica

It would be hard for anyone to guess this, and even someone looking over your shoulder might not catch it with a single look. Speaking of looking over shoulders, another security measure you'll want to take is turning off the "make pattern visible" option.

Next page: The benefit of invisible patterns and a scary setting you have to know about
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