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What women in tech say about hiring and retaining talented peers

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What women in tech say about hiring and retaining talented peers

When it comes to technology and other STEM fields, women still aren't as well-represented as they should be in the industry.

While there is an abundance of women who do end up joining the workforce in one of these categories, only about 26% of those who have degrees in science, technology, engineering or math actually work in technical careers, compared to a whopping 40% for men. And it's not just getting women into the fields that's a challenge – it's keeping them there, too. Women who enter these fields tend to leave at a 45% higher rate than their male counterparts.

So how do you attract and retain women in the tech field, despite these low retention rates and high rates of leaving the industry entirely?

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Indeed spoke to 1,000 women working in the tech field to speak about their findings as part of the industry to shed some light on what companies can do to bring on talented employees and keep them in the field, thus not contributing any further to the rising non-retention rates.

Why do women leave their jobs in tech?

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One of the biggest reasons women leave tech jobs is the lack of career growth opportunities, coming in as the top response from 28% of responders. It's not uncommon to join a new company and be promised one role with plenty of growth, only to be met with positions that others aren't leaving, or you aren't being hired into.

The second most common reason was poor management, which inspired 24.6% of survey responders to leave their positions. This is an issue that's common with all industries and isn't necessarily localized to STEM careers, but a problem nevertheless. Finally, the third most common reason was slow salary growth, which 24.4% of responders noted as one of their biggest reasons for leaving a job.

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For the rest of the survey, a variety of women responded with other reasons, such as being bored by their role or unchallenged by it, a frustrating work-life balance, a mismatch with company culture, or other reasons, some of which included the inadequacy of parental leave or maternity leave benefits.

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Money is a huge motivator, however, in every part of the survey. Salary was the most important deciding factor in a survey about how important it was when choosing a job. Along with slow wage growth, nearly half of women in tech felt they were being paid less than their male counterparts at 46%. Further, only 53% believed they could ask for a raise in their current positions.

How can we keep women in tech jobs?

There isn't one clear-cut answer, but there are certainly ways to help lessen some of the frustrations that come along with the reasons outlined in the survey that women leave their positions.

Most of them come partnered with transparency and openness about positions and their benefits, including salary, health care, and what they're getting into before applying for a job. A whopping 76% of women in tech said that salaries being posted in job descriptions and more overall transparency with positions, in general, would help them figure out whether they were being paid fairly or not.

Moreover, transparency for women feeling stuck in their roles with a lack of clear career growth opportunities would be appreciated, according to the survey. Many, 80% to be exact, were interested in switching to different roles in their companies and would love to do so if they knew more about how to go about doing it.

Employers can and should keep these things in mind and make sure to communicate clearly about what benefits they offer, how to go about capitalizing on said benefits, and ensuring its employees know how to access this information in the future should they need a reminder.

Are you a woman in tech looking to break into the industry or are you feeling fired up about getting involved as a woman in business? Act now! For a limited time, Indeed is offering new users a $50 credit. Just make your first job listing a Sponsored Job, with premium visibility so more candidates will see it. You want to make a great hire fast and this exclusive offer gives you a head start.

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