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Adult site tech support scam
© Yuliia Kaveshnikova | Dreamstime.com
Security & privacy

Yikes! Watch out for this porn scam that could cost you

You can browse the internet in whichever way you want. As long as it’s within the law, there are no restrictions on where you go or what you look at. But that does come with associated dangers as not all websites are family-friendly and virus-free. Tap or click here for details on the Dark Web and what you’ll find there.

The deeper you go into the internet’s underbelly, the greater your chances of picking up something nasty on your device. The Dark Web isn’t the only way to run into malware. Clicking malicious ads or links can also create serious problems.

Read on to find out how contacting tech support can cost your personal information.

Here’s the backstory

The Better Business Bureau (BBB) is warning about a new twist on a classic tech support scam. This latest scheme incorporates pornography as to why your system is experiencing problems. Here’s how the scam works.

Your computer is running poorly, the internet is slow or you’re having another type of problem that you need assistance with. So you go online and search for a tech support number. Unfortunately, scammers have set up fake tech support numbers to rip unsuspecting victims off.

If you call one of the fake numbers, a scam artist will answer and ask questions about your device, like its make and model number. Things seem normal at first. That’s when things take an odd turn.

The fraudulent tech support rep will dive into an elaborate story about how someone has been watching pornography on your device. They claim that your machine has been hacked due to visiting malicious adult content websites.

BBB gave a couple of creepy examples of reports it’s received. In one case, the scammer claimed that a caller’s teenage son was to blame for watching porn and causing the tech issues. In the other case, the fake rep claimed that thousands of people had used the caller’s IP address to watch porn.

Of course, the only solution is to purchase security software from the rep to fix the problems. The fee is anywhere from $200 to $1,000. In reality, that security software is as fake as the tech support rep trying to sell it to you.

If you buy the software, you’re handing over money to thieves and will not get it back. Not only that, but if you are having computer issues, they won’t be fixed by the scammy software.

And if they ask for remote access to your device, beware. Giving them remote access allows them to install malware onto your device. This could lead to stolen passwords, banking information and other personal data on your gadget. Don’t do it!

What you can do about it

The BBB has suggestions to avoid falling victim to these types of scams. Here are a few things to keep in mind:

  • Never open attachments or links in emails from unknown senders. These can generate fake warning pop-ups that prompt you to make a call to scammers. If you get a suspicious pop-up alert, don’t click on anything and restart your computer, tablet or phone.
  • Never give strangers remote access to your computer. You should only allow remote access to technicians of trustworthy companies you contacted through a legitimate customer service number or chat.
  • Avoid clicking on pop-up boxes or ads stating that something is wrong. If a pop-up won’t go away, disconnect from the internet and Wi-Fi by shutting off the device immediately and restarting it. 

If you’ve been the victim of a tech support scam, report it to BBB Scam Tracker. By reporting your experience, you can help others avoid falling for the same scam.

Another way to protect against malware is to have trustworthy antivirus software on all of your devices. We recommend our sponsor, TotalAV. Get an annual plan with TotalAV for only $19 at ProtectWithKim.com. That’s over 85% off the regular price!

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