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6-year-old hijacked mom's Amazon account to buy $350 worth of toys

6-year-old hijacked mom's Amazon account to buy $350 worth of toys

Kids can be so tech-savvy nowadays they can outsmart you with their "little schemes."

Do you remember the little girl in Texas who used an Amazon Echo to place an order for a dollhouse and cookies?

Or the kid who unlocked her mom's phone to buy $250 worth of Pokemon toys?

These tales of derring-do may sound cute now but they highlight the danger of giving your children access to your online shopping accounts - it's extremely easy to browse and buy things online, even a 6-year-old can do it!

Read on and see how this little girl may just have pulled the biggest heist of her life.

Ocean's Six-Year-Old?

Oh, kids. They're cute, they're funny, and they can swindle you out of $350 worth of toys, apparently.

Little Kaitlin, a first grader from Utah, pulled a sneaky con when her mother allowed her to order one Barbie doll for her birthday using her Amazon account.

And she did. However, Caitlin then asked her mom if she could check back on Amazon to see when her doll would arrive.

Behind that seemingly innocent request, her sneaky plan took shape - she went on a virtual shopping spree and secretly ordered $350 worth of toys!

The next day, (of course, she chose Next-Day shipping), her mom got a big surprise when boxes upon boxes of toy deliveries started appearing on their driveway. Whoops. Busted.

Yep, 6-year-old Kaitlin knew exactly what she was doing. So she browsed for the items she liked, put them in the cart, selected Next-Day shipping then checked them all out, all on her mom's dime. Ka-ching!

Kaitlin's cousin Ria Diyalou documented her little cousin's exploits with Twitter pictures for everyone to see.

Ria's tweet was posted on August 11 and has gone viral with more than 77,000 likes and almost 26,000 retweets as of this writing.

Although the story is cute, not everyone is amused by Kaitlin's sneaky shopping spree.

@ChangingLenses replied, "That’s good if you take all the money out of the kids [sic] allowance. Otherwise, there’s no cost to the child and therefore no consequence."

@Furbalicious wrote, "My mother wouldve [sic] SLAPPED that grin off my face, made me donate the toys to goodwill or sell em in a yardsale.. and recorded me cryinf [sic] about having to give up my new toys..."

@StaleBakes just laughed the whole thing off and noted how Kaitlin looks "so proud of herself too."

 

Kaitlin's antics won't go unpunished, though. According to Ria, Caitlin won't have internet access for a month.

But here's the best part, all the toys won't be returned, after all. Kaitlin and her family decided to donate all of them to the Children's Hospital where she stayed for a week when she was a baby! All's well that ends well, I guess?

Ever had a similar problem with your kids' unauthorized purchases? Here's how to get a refund.

How to prevent unauthorized purchases on your Amazon account

Well, kids will be kids. They won't hesitate to press that "Buy It Now" button when the opportunity arises so it's better to protect your accounts instead of dealing with that big dent in your bank account later.

Here are tips on how to protect your Amazon account from "accidental" purchases:

  • Disable "1-Click" shopping - Amazon's 1-Click shopping option allows you to set a default address, payment option, shipping method and address and purchase items instantly with the "Buy Now" button. To prevent accidental purchases, please disable this by going to "Your Account"> "1-Click settings">> then toggle it off.
  • Turn off "Purchase by Voice" - Alexa's "Purchase by Voice" option is a pretty nifty trick but it's a shopping disaster waiting to happen. To turn it off, open your Alexa app, tap Settings then scroll down, tap Voice Purchasing and toggle "Purchase by voice" to Off.
  • Require a confirmation PIN code - For extra security, set up a PIN code to avoid unauthorized purchases on your Alexa gadget. To set it up, go to the same Voice Purchasing settings page on your Alexa app, toggle "Purchase by Voice" to On, then toggle "Voice Code" to On as well. This will prompt you to enter your four-digit PIN.

 

In other news, hackers can use voicemail to break into your online accounts

Voicemail may still have its uses but according to report, it can be used for other malicious purposes. For example, resetting the passwords of all your online accounts like Google, Microsoft or Apple, perhaps? It sounds far-fetched but it's totally possible. Click here for the full story.

 

 

Read on and see what this attack is all about and what you can do to protect yourself.

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