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Facebook's creepy revenge porn program comes to U.S.

Facebook's creepy revenge porn program comes to U.S.
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Did you hear that Facebook really wants to help people with privacy? You know, how they feel bad about all that has gone wrong and that is just a small part of their plan to make it up to us?

There are commercials, blogs and stories -- along with testimony from Mark Zuckerberg himself -- all trying to convince us that their motivations are pure.

Well, the next step is trying to stop what is known as "revenge porn," the act of people using racy photos to get back at an ex. That sounds great, except the way in which Facebook plans on doing it is questionable, at best.

Sending a naked photo to someone else? Let Facebook see it, too

The plan is to have people send their pictures to Facebook, so that their employees can view them first. Really.

Facebook's Global Head of Security, Antigone Davis, wrote about the idea in a blog post:

"It’s demeaning and devastating when someone’s intimate images are shared without their permission, and we want to do everything we can to help victims of this abuse. We’re now partnering with safety organizations on a way for people to securely submit photos they fear will be shared without their consent, so we can block them from being uploaded to Facebook, Instagram and Messenger. This pilot program, starting in Australia, Canada, the U.K. and U.S., expands on existing tools for people to report this content to us if it’s already been shared."

Yep, Facebook is asking people who want to send naked photos to first run them through Facebook, where employees will view the pictures before blurring them out and creating what is known as a hash, or digital fingerprint, to prevent it from being shared further.

With image recognition technology, it would prevent the photo from being uploaded to Instagram, Facebook or Messenger.

Thanks Facebook!

Now, before you think letting Facebook employees who you don't know see your nude photos is a bad idea, you should know that the people who review the photos will be specially trained to help in such situations.

So at least there's that.

Could this actually be a good thing?

According to Davis, a Facebook team traveled to nine countries across four continents to listen to stories about abuse and cruelty that happens online. A big part of it was intimate moments that ended up being shared online without permission, which is a big part of what prompted this idea.

For a while now people have been able to report photos that have been shared without their consent, and when they are removed the site creates a hash to prevent it from being shared. The next step, they think, is making sure the photo never reaches Facebook or Instagram in the first place.

Yet while Facebook may have good intentions, it's tough to see people getting totally behind this. Anyone sending private photos obviously means for them to be seen by one person -- the one they are being sent to.

Besides, given Facebook's struggle with keeping data private, it is difficult to get past the idea of trusting them to ensure the photos you send in will not be taken as some part of a hack or data breach.

Really, the best way to avoid revenge porn being a thing is to not send or post those kinds of photos. Avoid that, and problem solved. But if you must send the photos, well, do so understanding the risk you are taking.

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Source: Daily Mail
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