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Comcast boosts internet speeds but not for cord cutters

Comcast boosts internet speeds but not for cord cutters
© Calvin L. Leake | Dreamstime.com

The more we do online, the faster internet speeds we require. Internet service providers all over are improving their networks and increasing speeds, albeit normally at a bit of a price.

For people who stream tons of content or play a lot of games, the extra cost may be worth it. For folks who just browse the internet and check email on their computers, probably not.

Provider giant Comcast is banking on people ultimately wanting a faster internet. They believe that desire will help to offset the losses it is suffering as more cable watchers cut the cord.

Will it work?

If you have not yet cut the cord from cable, you probably know someone who has. It is becoming more commonplace, and cable companies are certainly aware of the trend.

(Bonus: Click here to check out Kim's eBook "Cutting the Cord on Cable TV eGuide" for helpful advice.)

Understanding this, Comcast is looking to internet to help prevent some from leaving. Customers who currently have 60Mbps internet download speeds will see theirs boosted to up to 150Mbps, whereas people with 150Mbps will rise to 250Mpbs. Anyone already receiving 250Mbps will see their speeds rise to upwards of 400Gps or even 1Gps.

Those increases happen automatically and will not come at an additional cost. That is, as long as you also subscribe to Comcast's TV service. Clever!

It might also be necessary. In its last quarterly earnings report, Comcast revealed it lost 96,000 video customers. In 2017 alone, it said goodbye to 150,000 video subscribers.

Comcast, which still has 22 million video customers and 26 million internet subscribers, attributes the drop to residential accounts being canceled.

It's not just Comcast

Streaming services continue to pick up steam as well as customers, and as it happens, more are deciding to forego cable altogether. (Note: Click here to see our streaming service channel line-ups comparison chart.)

Sling TV added 711,000 customers in 2017, bringing its base to 2.2 million, while DirecTV Now gained 888,000 subscribers last year. As services like those and Netflix, Amazon, YouTube TV and others continue to grow, traditional cable is poised to shrink.

With fewer people paying for cable and instead turning to other TV options, companies that once relied on cable subscribers are having to look elsewhere for revenue. Since streaming services rely on internet to function, it makes sense that's where they would turn.

Comcast traditionally touted how often it would increase internet speeds without charging more for them, but that used to benefit all customers, whether they had cable or not. But times, they are a changing.

Moves like this, as well as instituting data caps like Comcast already has, may be the wave of the future. No matter the provider, they are all being forced to grapple with a world where people are moving on from cable in favor of streaming services.

And that's just it, really. Even if you do not have Comcast this new way of doing business will likely impact you, if it hasn't already.

It's worth looking into

Most cable providers also offer internet, and like Comcast, will likely offer price savings if you bundle services together. If you use multiple services from the same provider, give them a call to see if there are any deals you can sign up for.

If none of that is enough to convince you to keep your cable, though, there are plenty of streaming options you can check out. Just understand that by dropping one service, you may end up increasing the price of another.

If you want to cut the cord, these 10 streaming apps are your best bet

If you decide that you want to cut the cord, you'll probably want to download a streaming app or two. You might want one that has thousands of programs already canned and another that offers live streaming TV. There are plenty to choose from.

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Source: ARS Technica
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