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Shocker! Facebook will start charging money for access

Shocker! Facebook will start charging money for access
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Facebook has been all over the news lately, and none of it is good. The negative press began a few weeks ago with the Cambridge Analytica fiasco.

In that case, Cambridge Analytica is said to have gathered over 87 million Facebook users' personal data by way of a third-party app. It reportedly used this data to influence political campaigns. Scary! It's safe to assume that the number of people effected will increase too!

Facebook is trying to figure out how to clean up that mess. Get this, you might have to start paying to use its site as a result.

Would you pay to use Facebook?

The Cambridge Analytica situation is only the beginning. An internal Facebook memo from 2016 was also recently leaked. It basically said that despite the social ramifications and consequences brought about by Facebook, it should be business as usual.

Many of the privacy issues brought on by the likes of Facebook stem from targeted ads. The company makes money by providing targeted ads to users. Its nearly 2 billion users have been able to use Facebook at no cost in exchange for giving up a stockpile of information to advertisers.

Information that is being collected on you include phone numbers, text messages, physical addresses and demographic data to name a few items.

Now, Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg said on Today on NBC that if users want to guarantee their personal information won't end up in the hands of advertisers, it'll come at a cost. Sandberg said the company's targeted ad business model will not change unless users are willing to pay for using the site.

Yes, you will have to start paying for Facebook and that is no guarantee that there still will not be targeted advertising.

It's hard to imagine actually paying to use Facebook, especially after all of the privacy and security problems that have been in the spotlight recently. That and the fact that we've been using it for free for over a decade makes it difficult to justify paying to use the site.

I personally would never pay to use Facebook. In fact, I'd rather delete my account than take the chance of losing my privacy. If you want to learn how to delete your Facebook account, click here.

Listen now to get in-depth details on the Cambridge Analytica blunder

Want to hear an in-depth discussion about the Cambridge Analytica blunder? Listen to the following Komando on Demand podcast where you'll learn how your online privacy was compromised.

Kim Komando speaks to experts on this matter you don't want to miss.

Cambridge Analytica manipulated you, then harvested your personal data and psychographic profiles through Facebook. But did you help? Is it too late to protect yourself? Can you get your privacy back? What are your rights? Does online privacy even exist? The laws are changing, so listen now for my inside scoop from an Internet Security Lawyer and a risk management pro.

Click the Play button and listen now. You'll be glad that you did!

That's just one of the great topics from the Komando On Demand Podcast, but Kim shares a new podcast each week on her site and on iTunes and Google Play.

She also shares the latest updates from the tech world in her other free podcasts. Consumer Tech UpdateTech News Today and Tech News This Week. Take a listen!

More bad news, Facebook is collecting all of your call and text data, how you can turn it off

Facebook is keeping track of phone calls and text messages. If that sounds bad that's because it is, though according to Facebook it's not exactly what it seems.

Click here to learn about Facebook's data collection process and how to turn it off.

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Source: Daily Mail
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