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Warning! This Netflix scam could empty your bank account

Warning! This Netflix scam could empty your bank account
Dreamstime

Cybercriminals are constantly targeting popular websites. That's because the more popular the site is, the more potential victims there are.

Which brings us to the latest scam making the rounds. With nearly 100 million subscribers worldwide, Netflix is one of the most popular streaming services available. Now, Netflix users are being targeted with a devious scam that you really need to watch out for.

Watch out for this Netflix scam

Netflix users are receiving phishing emails in their inboxes.

Share this information with anyone you know who might be gullible to fall for this scam. This Netflix scam is really convincing. It's super easy to get fooled by these phishing emails. We have an example below.

The sender of the email is SupportNetflix. There's a support phone number too.

The fraudulent messages can look official to the untrained eye but they are actually spoofed by cybercriminals.

Look at this sample email

The email claims that Netflix is having trouble authorizing your credit card on file. Your account is on hold. You need to enter a new credit card number. That happens.

To resolve the issue, the recipient is told to click a link within the email to either enter their payment information again or to use a different payment method.

If you click on the link, you'll be taken to a spoofed scammer's site. There, you will be asked to enter your credit card information and once you do, the criminal can access your bank account.

The image below is an example of a Netflix phishing scam. Can you spot problems in the message that gives away that it's a scam?

Image: Example of Netflix phishing email

Another thing that gives this scam away is the phone number it lists as Netflix Customer Service. If you do a Google search of that number the results point out that it's fraudulent.

How to handle Netflix phishing emails

Netflix is well aware that scammers are constantly sending its users phishing emails. The company wants users to know that it will never ask for personal information to be sent over email. This includes:

  • Payment information (credit card number, debit card number, direct debit account, PIN, etc.)
  • Social Security number for U.S. citizens (in any form), identification number, or tax identification number.
  • Your account password.

Netflix may email you to update this information but you should always type the web address directly into your browser instead of clicking links in emails. This will help ensure you're not clicking on a phishing link.

Here are more suggestions to defeat phishing attacks:

Be cautious with links

Do not follow unsolicited web links in email messages, it could be a phishing scam. Cybercriminals always take advantage of popular websites and trending news stories to try and find new victims. That's why you need to be able to recognize a phishing scam. Phishing attacks are infamous for having typos. If you receive an email or notification from a reputable company, it should not contain typos. Take our phishing IQ test to see if you can spot a fake email.

Have strong security software

Make sure you're using strong antivirus software on all of your gadgets. And keep them up-to-date for the best protection. This is the best way to keep your device from being infected with malware.

Use unique passwords

Many people use the same password for multiple websites. This is a terrible mistake. If your credentials are stolen on one site and you use the same username and/or password on others, it's easy for the cybercriminal to get into each account. Click here to find out how to create hack-proof passwords.

Set up two-factor authentication 

Two-factor authentication, also known as two-step verification, means that to log in to your account, you need two ways to prove you are who you say you are. It's like the DMV or bank asking for two forms of ID. This adds an extra layer of security and should be used whenever a site makes it available. Click here to learn how to set up two-factor authentication.

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