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PayPal and Amazon phishing scams spreading now

PayPal and Amazon phishing scams spreading now

'Tis the season to be jolly and the holiday shopping rush has begun. For sure, with the influx of holiday promotions, online receipts, shipping data and tracking information, your email inbox is probably inundated with messages from retail outlets, online and brick-and-mortar stores alike.

These holiday emails can get overwhelming and of course, the ever opportunistic scammers will, once again, try and slip a quick email scam on unsuspecting shoppers. We even warned you about how scammers will try and fool you with various techniques like misspellings and typosquatting.

But still, email phishing scams remain the most widespread method for stealing customer information. Popular phishing campaigns include favorite online shopping destinations like Amazon and payment service PayPal and they typically skyrocket during the holiday season.

So before you make that list, better check your emails twice.

Here are two spreading phishing scams we have personally spotted lately:

Amazon Order Phishing Scam

Beware if your inbox has a purported email from Amazon with this subject line: "Your Amazon.com order cannot be shipped." That email is most likely a phishing attempt.

The email contains this message:

Hello, There was a problem processing your order. You will not be able to access your account or place orders with us until we confirm your information. Click here to confirm your account. We ask that you not open new accounts as any order you place may be delayed.

For more details, read our Amazon Prime Terms & Conditions.

Unsuspecting recipients who click on the provided link for "account confirmation" will be directed to a fake but convincing "Amazon" webpage where they are asked to re-enter their names, address and credit card information.

The whole thing is a sham, of course, and if you enter your information and click "Save & Continue," it is game over, the scammers will now have everything they need. To keep your suspicion down, they will even redirect you to the real Amazon website when the phishing process is complete.

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