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Firefox identifies 130 serious security bugs

Firefox identifies 130 serious security bugs
PHOTO COURTESY OF THREAT POST

Google Chrome may be top dog when it comes to the most popular web browsers, but Mozilla Firefox certainly isn't the underdog. While Chrome attracted around 46 percent of web users in 2015, Firefox, Internet Explorer and even Safari were clinging to its coattails.

Over the past few years, Firefox has averaged around 16 percent of the market. However, that number declined in 2015, dropping to just over 14 percent. Is it possible that this decline is due to all of the security issues that have plagued Firefox over the past year?

Yes, it is. But that may be due to some misconceptions about the nature of the internet and browsers in general.

According to The Register, Mozilla Firefox has patched 130 serious flaws in 2016 alone. We've shared many of these critical Firefox patches over the course of the year through stories like this one, as well as changes to the browser's features.

To find many of these holes, Firefox uses what are known as "bug bounty programs." These programs essentially assign hackers the task of finding security issues within Mozilla's software that could potentially lead to serious security issues. The findings of these "hacks" are then reported back to Mozilla so that patches can be developed and released.

Programs such as these are essential tools that identify potential problems before they occur, rather than after a vulnerability has been exploited.

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