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Samsung's fix for exploding smartphones dumps responsibility on end-users

Samsung's fix for exploding smartphones dumps responsibility on end-users

Have you heard about the major safety issue with one of Samsung's most popular phones? Nearly 2.5 million of the gadgets were recently recalled after dozens of cases of exploding batteries were reported. You can see an example by clicking here to read our story on how an exploding phone caused a man's vehicle to catch fire.

Even though only one out of every 42,000 smartphones are affected, Samsung decided to stop shipping the product, pulled them all from the shelves and promised a replacement to anyone who already owned one. Now, Samsung is coming out with a quick fix for those who decided to keep their phone.

In an effort to reduce the chance for batteries in the Samsung Galaxy Note 7 to explode, the company will begin rolling out a software update next week. The update will not allow the phone's battery to be charged above 60 percent. They think that keeping the battery level low will reduce the chance of overheating and thus, causing it to explode.

Having your phone only charge to 60 percent doesn't seem like a major problem, but think of the limitations that it creates. Streaming movies for hours at a time, and speaking with friends and family over Skype are just some of the things you do that could be affected. When your phone dies right before the end of a movie, it is very annoying.

Samsung believes the exploding issue was created by an error in the production of the smartphone. They think the error heightened pressure on plates located in the battery cells, which could allow the negative and positive poles to touch. This might have caused the overheating problem, but the company is still doing research to make sure.

The software update will begin rolling out next week in South Korea. It's unknown when the update will be released everywhere else, but Samsung is in talks with mobile carriers to come up with a delivery date. Once the software update is delivered, it will be forced onto the Note 7 without user consent.

If you already own a Galaxy Note 7 or are going to buy a new one, there is a way to check if it's defective. New, safe gadgets will have a round sticker on top of the box in the right corner with a blue "S." You will also see a small black box located on the bottom right corner of the barcode sticker.

Samsung is urging customers to take advantage of its voluntary recall for the smartphone. If you already own the Galaxy Note 7, turning it in for exchange is probably your safest move.

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Source: Fortune
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