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New tech makes Wi-Fi 10 times faster

New tech makes Wi-Fi 10 times faster
MIT News

A new technological breakthrough has put researchers from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in the spotlight once again. A couple of weeks ago everyone was talking about their gold, temporary tattoos that can control devices. Mass, commercialized use of these tattoos may not come about until the more distant future, but everyone will be eager to start using their latest discovery as soon as possible.

Everyone loves free Wi-Fi in public places because it prevents them from using their own data. But when too many people try to connect to the same network, it slows everyone down. Bright, young scientists at MIT may have created a way to fix that.

MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL) is the team behind MegaMIMO 2.0, which is a system that enables routers to work with each other instead of against each other. When a lot of people are gathered in one place for an event, such as a football stadium, airport, or concert venue, there are multiple routers to support all the people that wish to connect. But having so many routers try to work in a confined area normally leads to interference, which in turn leads to slow connection speeds.

MIMO stands for multiple input and multiple output. The researchers figured out a way to enable routers to send and receive information without slowing each other down by syncing them up. For more information on how it works, check out the CSAIL website.

It may be a while before we can start using this new router system. The researchers are talking to other companies to form a plan for monetizing the system. Until a deal is reached, consider buying a Wi-Fi extender, upgrading to a more powerful router, or check out these other solutions for slow Wi-Fi.

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