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Your favorite social media site may be shutting down forever

Your favorite social media site may be shutting down forever
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Kids have it rough in the digital age. Modern day cyberbullies attack them on social media, the internet and dozens of different messaging apps. Attacks can escalate from harmless teasing to downright vicious assaults, often with tragic consequences.

If you've ever been on Facebook or Twitter, you might have seen it happen right in front of your eyes. Hurtful posts are all around, so it's not too hard to miss. They might be embedded in the comments, they might be on people's walls, they might be tags, they could be sent via direct message.

In fact, cyberbullying is so bad on Twitter that there have been rumors running rampant that the site will be shutting down in 2017 because it can't get its users' cyberbullying under control.

#SaveTwitter began trending on the site, and while Twitter representatives have admitted that the site does indeed have a cyberbullying problem, it says there is absolutely no truth to the rumors it will be shutting down because of it. Simply put, it's a hoax.

Tools to fight cyberbullying
Be sure to keep yourself informed and up to date with all of the latest threats so you can keep everyone safe. For instance, bookmark sites like Kids Safety and Family Online Safety Institute.

There are also resources for what to do after you've been attacked online, how to fight back against cyberbullying and basic steps to keep yourself and your kids safe online.

Don't get fooled by social media hoaxes
The saying used to be "you can't trust everything you read in the paper." That saying evolved into "you can't believe everything you see on television" and now it's evolved to "you can't always believe what you read or see on the internet." Here are some resources you can use to help spot a hoax before you get fooled:

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