Leave a comment

Facebook study your boss will hate

Facebook study your boss will hate

If you know any millennials and recent college grads, this is, like, the best news ever!

While you were in school, do you remember rewarding yourself with maybe a snack or a movie break if you wrote a certain amount of a term paper, or read a certain amount of a textbook? Mental breaks are a good thing and they're proven to boost productivity. Otherwise, your brain just feels stale after a while.

Well, guess what? The same rules apply when you enter the work force.

There was a recent study done in China that proves that browsing social media sites at work could actually be good for productivity, counterintuitive as that may sound. But there's an emphasis on "light" usage of social media.

This study was catered toward recent college grads who are working their first full-time jobs. In most cases, entry-level positions are not as exciting as some young professionals have hoped for. But when you're working your way up the corporate ladder, you have to start somewhere, and that's usually at the bottom.

The social media theory suggests that browsing sites such as Facebook, Twitter and Instagram will help young employees cope with the stress of a new job and the routine of working long hours by having a distraction every so often. Going from college life to working life can be quite a shock to some people, especially when the wage they're working for wasn't what they expected.

The study, which appeared in the journal "Employee Relations," suggests that "the use of social media at work can be a positive thing, as long as it’s done in moderation. A little bit of personal social media can spur creativity and give workers an outlet for their stress. But too much social media use, as you might guess, makes people unproductive and often signals that the person feels alienated from his or her job."

So there is definitely a fine line, and ideally, as young professionals find themselves getting promoted over time and finding better suited jobs with higher pay, the dependency on social media should proportionally decrease. Especially as higher positions generate more responsibility, after a while, casual browsing on Facebook may get phased out. Unless you're lucky enough to actually have social media marketing as part of your job description.

Next Story
Temperature bubbles will end "are you cold" debates!
Previous Happening Now

Temperature bubbles will end "are you cold" debates!

FREE Download: Photos instantly turned into mini movies
Next Happening Now

FREE Download: Photos instantly turned into mini movies

View Comments ()