Leave a comment

New accessory can predict stroke

New accessory can predict stroke
PHOTO COURTESY OF SHUTTERSTOCK

Nothing is more important than your health, the saying goes. It's true.

You have to be healthy, if you want to provide for your family, remain independent and enjoy life to the fullest. If that describes your attitude toward life, you're probably regularly getting your heart checked by your doctor.

Your doctor uses an electrocardiogram (EKG) to monitor your heart. EKGs track the electric signal your heart produces, to ensure you have a regular heartbeat. It also checks for an irregular heartbeat, or atrial fibrillation, to alert you to strokes and other heart conditions.

Wouldn't it be great if you could have an EKG with you at all times? That would give you peace of mind.

By this spring, you could be wearing a medical-grade EKG on your wrist. This EKG is far more advanced than the heart monitors you find on fitness trackers and smartwatches.

Kardia Band for Apple Watch

The AliveCor Kardia Band sensor and app for Apple Watch is an EKG to monitor your heartbeat. Its Atrial Fibrillation Detector uses an algorithm to detect AF, the most common arrhythmia. That can cause a stroke.

The Kardia Band has a Normal Detector to tell you when your heart rate and rhythm are normal. Its Unreadable Detector alerts you if you need to retake an EKG because it didn't get a good reading.

You can use its voice recorder to describe how you feel during certain EKG readings. That information can be invaluable for your doctor.

In contrast, the standard Apple Watch and other smartwatches use photoplethysmography to monitor your heart. Those are flashes of LED light that measure your heart rate by tracking blood flow.

Would you wear an EKG sensor on your wrist? Let us know in comments.

Kardia Band for Apple Watch

Next Story
Source: Time
View Comments ()
Top Story: Warning - sophisticated ransomware attacks surging
Previous Happening Now

Top Story: Warning - sophisticated ransomware attacks surging

Help Alzheimer's patients remain independent longer
Next Happening Now

Help Alzheimer's patients remain independent longer