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Why Facebook may be putting national security at risk (Hint: They say it's to protect you)

Why Facebook may be putting national security at risk (Hint: They say it's to protect you)
PHOTO COURTESY OF SHUTTERSTOCK

Everyone knows that Apple is in a major standoff with the FBI over access to data on a suspected terrorist's locked smartphone. But did you know that Apple isn't the only company saying "no" to the government when it comes to their users' privacy?

According to recent reports, additional big-name companies are beefing up their encryption and privacy tools to keep others (including the government) out. These companies include Facebook, Google and Snapchat - some of the largest companies in Silicon Valley.

As the court battle between Apple and the FBI has moved up the legal chain, FBI chief, James Comey, has continually defended the government's position. In a recent meeting with the House Judiciary Committee, Comey explained, "It's our job to tell the American people the tools we use to keep you safe are becoming less effective. If there are warrant-proof spaces in American life, what does that mean? What are the costs?"

These "warrant-proof" spaces Comey referred to are our gadgets, as well as the apps we download and use within them. The government's stance is that being denied a "back door" to access key evidence in cases like the San Bernardino shootings, puts our national security at risk.

On the other hand, companies like Facebook, Google and Snapchat, seem to be rallying behind Apple's position - which is, creating this back door would put everyone at risk of having their privacy invaded by the government.

Who's right, and who's wrong? Kim weighed in on this issue a few weeks ago in an episode of the Kim Komando On Demand Podcast. So, check it out to see where she stands.

To further secure its platform, Facebook has announced plans to extend its secure messaging service for its WhatsApp app. Google and Snapchat are also creating stronger barriers to secure their instant messaging platforms and email products.

Overall, the bottom line is that what's happening right now will set the new precedent for governing law moving forward. Members of Apple's legal counsel have stated that the public needs to understand that "encryption is a good thing" and that creating the tool that the government is asking for could leave all users vulnerable.

What do you think? Are these companies right in standing up to the government, or should they be forced to comply?

Let us know in the comments.

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Source: Daily Mail
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