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A guy hacked Trivia Crack to get a prom date. Here's why that should worry you

A guy hacked Trivia Crack to get a prom date. Here's why that should worry you
trivia crack

A hacker helped a high school student ask out his prom date using Trivia Crack. You have to see how they did it. But if you play this game, your smile will quickly fade when you realize your personal information is accessible through the app.

Jon Wyatt was the brave kid who reached out to Joe Levy, a Microsoft program manager known for hacking popular apps and games. Levy was sought after for his particular skill of hacking the desktop version of the game Trivia Crack.

“I never thought my Trivia Crack-ing could have such humanitarian uses!” Levy told Wired Magazine.

Earlier this year, Levy exploited a security flaw on the game that allowed him to change the questions and answers of trivia questions to anything he wanted. In a stroke of romantic genius, Wyatt asked Levy to manipulate the coding in the game to ask the girl to prom.

The reason Wyatt chose to ask her over Trivia Crack?

“Mostly because I thought of the idea while playing it with the girl I eventually asked to go to prom with me,” he explained to Wired.

Fair enough. The girl clicked "Yes" as her answer to the trivia question and they enjoyed a lovely prom night - but the story doesn't end there.

What about the flaw that Levy exploited during his quest to promote true love and interesting prom invitations? It can actually be used to do things much more dangerous and devastating to your identity.

This type of hack is carried out through Internet browser extensions to the original app that are disguised as genuine products.

Desktop

"You may think you’re talking to your bank’s website, when really there’s a Chrome extension modifying your requests and the banking website’s responses, recording all of your sensitive data as it does so," Levy said in a blog post.

There are also ways to do this with malicious coding that scans the Trivia Crack database for information like users' full names, email addresses, Facebook IDs and account information, even who their friends are.

Levy and other Internet security gurus have warned Trivia Crack developers about this scary flaw, but there has no action on their part so far.

We'll keep you updated as soon as we hear any news about this flaw. But until then, delete the app from your phone and make sure you remove the entire program, not just the app from your home screen.

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Source: Wired
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