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Your iPhone has a critical flaw only iOS 9 can fix

Your iPhone has a critical flaw only iOS 9 can fix
Apple

iOS 9 comes out today, and it's not soon enough. We now know that iPhones have a serious security vulnerability that could give a hacker control of your phone. Normally, you'd probably wait a few days to update your system to a new operating system, but there's a good reason to get iOS 9 immediately.

We've explained how the AirDrop feature, which lets users share files over Wi-Fi or Bluetooth, can be used maliciously. Now a cybersecurity expert named Mark Dowd has discovered a vulnerability in AirDrop that allows malware to infect your iPhone. If you receive an infected file over AirDrop, the next time you reboot your iPhone a fake app will install on your iPhone, and the attacker can gain access to your camera, your location, your contacts and more.

Apple has fixed the vulnerability with a security upgrade in iOS 9, the operating system just released today. To download iOS 9 on your iPhone or iPad, go into Settings, click General, then click Software Update. You'll want to either be connected to Wi-Fi with your device plugged in or have your device connected to a computer with iTunes for this update.

Since iOS 9 has been beta-tested by some users for months now, this first version shouldn't have any bugs, and it's compatible with devices back to the iPhone 4S and iPad 2. Not only will your phone be safe from the AirDrop vulnerability with iOS 9, you'll get some cool new features. Click here to read about 5 great new features in iOS 9, and check back regularly to our Happening Now page for all the latest news on cybersecurity and all things digital.

Here's a video cybersecurity researcher Mark Dowd made demonstrating the AirDrop vulnerability in iOS 8:

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