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Now anybody can 3-D print the TSA's master luggage keys

Now anybody can 3-D print the TSA's master luggage keys
photo courtesy of SHUTTERSTOCK

Back in November of 2014, the Washington Post ran an article titled, "The secret life of baggage: Where does your luggage go at the airport?" The article detailed happenings behind the scenes with the TSA and showed us the process of baggage handling at certain airports.

But here's where the Washington Post got it wrong. In the article, it published a photo of the TSA's master key, the key that can open any TSA-approved luggage lock.

While the photo was only online for a short period of time, the damage was already done. The photo went viral and now, the keys can easily be made by anyone with a 3-D printer. In fact, the files are easily accessible at Github, and one user claims the entire process took under five minutes.

 

So who's at fault here? Is it the Washington Post for publishing the photos? Or is the TSA to blame for letting the keys be photographed in the first place?

Matt Blaze, a University of Pennsylvania computer science professor told Wired: “In high-security environments, it’s clear that you want people to not just take photos of your keys, but to not even look at them,” he says. “We would hope the TSA would have taken better care of their keys than they have.”

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