Leave a comment

Our old credit cards are costing us HUGE in fraud

Our old credit cards are costing us HUGE in fraud
Photo courtesy of Shutterstock

Credit cards were introduced in the 1950s, and although you likely don't have one of those golden oldies in your wallet right now, chances are you do have some cards in there that are easily vulnerable to fraud.

In the U.S., credit card companies have just recently been updating the technology in your card. The new cards include a more secure chip that's used in conjunction with your PIN to prevent identity theft. Many European countries made the switch years ago.

If you don't have one of the new "chip-and-PIN" cards, thieves just need to swipe your older non-chip-and-PIN card through a reader to get your information and create a new PIN. This is known as "card skimming." Learn how you can spot card skimmers before they steal your information.

Once it's swiped, your information is often sold on the "Dark Web," the hidden part of the Internet most of us never access. Find out what dangerous and illegal things lurk in the Dark Web and how it affects you.

These less-secure cards contribute to the $6 billion Americans lost last year alone due to identity theft, which some estimates say occurs every two seconds. Thirteen million Americans were victimized in 2014.

Credit card companies are increasingly adapting their cards to the more secure chip-and-PIN technology, but merchants are slower to catch up. That's because businesses must upgrade to new machines to process the new credit cards.

If you want to help speed up the process, let your favorite retailers know that you want them to adopt stronger security. Hopefully if enough of their customers complain, they'll get the message and we'll all be safer.

Next Story
Source: CBS
The 'Rowhammer' bug is in almost every Intel computer chip
Previous Happening Now

The 'Rowhammer' bug is in almost every Intel computer chip

Major TV maker to start tracking what customers watch
Next Happening Now

Major TV maker to start tracking what customers watch

View Comments ()