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Hackers' app combs your private photos for nude images

Hackers' app combs your private photos for nude images
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Putting nude photos online, even in password protected areas, is just really unwise. Last year over 100 celebrities learned that the hard way when their nude photos were hacked from their iCloud accounts. But just in case you need any more proof to convince your kids, grandchildren or anyone else to never upload any compromising images, no matter how "secure" they think they are, here you go.

The FBI just arrested and charged two men in an absolutely despicable scheme. According to the U.S. Department of Justice, the two men developed software that bypassed security settings on the popular photo website, Photobucket. But just wait, because this story gets worse!

The government alleges the men sold the software to others for a very specific reason: to comb through Photobucket accounts looking for private nude photos. Now many of us would seriously question the wisdom of taking - much less uploading - compromising nude photos, but that still is no excuse for strangers gawking over private photos.

In this case, it looks like the FBI is not messing around. These guys are facing some very serious charges. But just wait until you see how many years their scheme had been going on!

According to the indictment, beginning on July 12, 2012 and continuing through July 1, 2014, the men allegedly developed, marketed and sold their password-stealing-software. I can only imagine how many accounts were hacked and photos stolen during those nearly two years.

But the FBI seems to be taking this case seriously. Both men face one count of conspiracy, which carries a penalty of not more than five years in federal prison and up to a $250,000 fine.  They each face one count of computer fraud, aid and abet, which also carries a penalty of not more than five years in federal prison and up to a $250,000 fine.  Finally, they each face two counts of access device fraud, which carries a penalty of not more than ten years in federal prison, and up to a $250,000 fine, per count.

“It is not safe to hide behind your computer, breach corporate servers and line your own pockets by victimizing those who have a right to protected privacy on the internet,” said U.S. Attorney John Walsh for the District of Colorado.  “The U.S. Attorney’s Office is keenly focused on prosecuting those people for their theft -- and for the wanton harm they do to innocent internet users.”

“Unauthorized access into a secure computer system is a serious federal crime,” said Special Agent in Charge Thomas Ravenelle for the Denver Division of the FBI.  “The arrest of Brandon Bourret and his co-conspirator reflects the FBI’s commitment to investigate those who undertake activities such as this with the intent to harm a company and its customers.”

The FBI says the investigation is continuing as they try to determine how many accounts were breached and whose photos have been stolen.

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