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Amazon, Walmart passwords possibly leaked

Amazon, Walmart passwords possibly leaked
photo courtesy of shutterstock

Another day, another hack. This one isn't cut and dry, though. The notorious hacker group Anonymous released 13,000 passwords on the Internet recently and claimed they came from several popular online stores and sites, including Amazon and Walmart.

But, not everyone is so sure the hack is real. In fact, Walmart has denied the claims outright and others think it might be a hoax. Anonymous posted the file to a file sharing site called Ghostbin. The group also claims that it posted a copy of the controversial movie "The Interview" for users to download.

The file also included the accounts of a number of dating and porn sites, and it appears to have some passwords for a popular security program known as CyberGhost, which protects you from a hacker snooping on you when you use public WiFi hotspots.

Allegedly, the passwords come from Amazon, Dell, Hulu Plus, Origin.com, PlayStation, Shutterstock, Twitch.tv, Walmart and Xbox Live. Just in case the hack is real, there are some security precautions you should take.

While many think the hack is hoax, you should still make sure your accounts are safe just in case. If you have an account on any of the sites possibly affected by the supposed hack, just go in to your account and change your password. That way, if the hack is real, the stolen password will be outdated.

Make sure the new password you choose is strong. Otherwise, you're just opening up your account to more security risks. Click here to read my tips to create a strong password that works.

Changing your password is a simple way to make sure your account is secure. Sadly, nowadays we have to take every hacking threat seriously - even when many think it's nothing more than a hoax.

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