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Next year, T-Mobile will let you keep your unused data

Next year, T-Mobile will let you keep your unused data
photo courtesy of SHUTTERSTOCK

Without a cellular data plan, a smartphone isn't very smart, unless you're near a Wi-Fi hotspot. In fact, when you buy most smartphones, a cellular data plan is mandatory. And, as you know, data plans don't come cheap, even if you try my tricks for saving on your cellular bill.

That's why it feels like a waste when you don't use all your monthly data and everything resets when the next month rolls around. You're basically paying for something you didn't use.

You could always switch to a lower data plan - learn the mistakes to avoid when picking a new one -  but maybe some months you do use all the data. Do you have to resign yourself to wasting data some months?

Not if T-Mobile has anything to say about it. It just announced a new feature that does something carriers should have been doing all along.

T-Mobile's new feature is called Data Stash, which launches in January. Any data you don't use in one month rolls over in the stash for the next month.

So, if you know you're going to be traveling next month and using a lot of data, you can cut back this month so you'll have enough. How cool is that?

There are still some catches, obviously. The stash only lasts for a year and then it resets. Also, it's only a feature on smartphone plans with 3GB of data or more, or tablet users with 1GB of data or more.

However, as an incentive to switch carriers and upgrade plans, T-Mobile is putting 10GB of free data in the stash for new and current customers.

Just like "rollover minutes" became an industry standard back in the day, let's hope "rollover data" catches on with the other carriers as well. It's a plan feature that's long overdue.

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