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Wireless Christmas lights will save you from cord spaghetti

Wireless Christmas lights will save you from cord spaghetti
Photo courtesy of Shutterstock

When I was growing up, our family's post-Thanksgiving tradition was untangling the Christmas lights and watching dad hunt down and replace the burnt-out bulbs. It was good for a few hours of entertainment.

Thankfully, LED Christmas lights have mostly fixed the burnt-out bulb problem, but there's still those pesky tangles. No matter how carefully you put away the lights, next year you're still in for a mess.

That's why there's a Kickstarter for a product called Aura. It's the first set of wireless Christmas lights for a Christmas tree. No, really.

There are two parts, the power ring and the lights themselves. The lights are bright LEDs and actually look like round Christmas ornaments.

You put the power ring at the base of the tree - or in the middle for taller trees - where it throws out a low-power, highly tuned magnetic field. Placing the ornaments on the tree moves them into the field and they light up. You can control the lights with a remote or mobile app.

There are six bulb options: clear white and multicolor, frosted white and multicolor and crackle white and multicolor. The colors are red, green, blue and orange.

The lights are designed to last for 20 years. However, if one ever does break, you can just replace it. No messing with replacement bulbs or light strings.

This is still a Kickstarter project, and as of this writing it hadn't reached its $50,000 goal yet. Still, it's at $46,000 with 44 days left to go, so I'm sure it will be funded and shipping next October as planned. Click here to see its status, or if you want to contribute.

Just think, this could be the last year you have to deal with tangled Christmas lights. Wouldn't that be a nice present?

Watch this video to see Aura in action.

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