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Creepy new park bench is an invasion of privacy 

Imagine you're taking a leisurely stroll around your favorite park. It's been a long walk and now it's time for a well-deserved rest, so you make your way to the nearest park bench.

But as soon as you sit down, you're confronted with some personal information. And I mean really personal information.

This park bench is displaying for everyone to see exactly what you weigh.

Not only that, but it's also recommending healthy eating tips and nearby fitness clubs and beauty shops for you to check out.

Who in the world has that kind of nerve?

Thankfully, it's nowhere near the U.S. These new "smart" - more like rude - benches are being installed in Sokolniki park in Russia.

The park director plans to install at least 20 of these new benches this year. These benches cost nearly $1,300 (50,000 rubles) apiece and are funded by investors.

This park bench plan is not the first time that smart seats have been used. A fitness club in the Netherlands installed similar benches at a bus stop as part of an advertising campaign.

It's just another way of helping people to think more about their health, but fat-shaming has never been a good idea. Take a look at some of these health-minded apps and gadgets that are a lot more helpful - and a lot less public - about your personal health.

There are better ways to monitor your health, and surprisingly, Apple is at the forefront of the health race. Why does a tech giant care about your health? Find out why Apple wants to enter the realm of healthcare. 

Want to know the state of the world's health? This constantly updated map is a great place for a look at what's going on around the world. Click here to learn more. 

To monitor your health in a more personal way, check out the latest apps on Health and Wellness or see what's new on my Happening Now page. 

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