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Problems with new Apple iOS 8 for iPads and iPhones

Users of Apple’s new iPad and iPhone software are finding some annoying bugs that crash their gadgets and burn through battery life. What’s going on with Apple’s latest and greatest? Well, you knew there'd be glitches, right?

But some reports say Apple's new iOS 8 crashes iPhones and iPads 78% more than the previous system. Unfortunately, that could be serious trouble for new iOS 8 users.

So why are they crashing more?

In most cases, these crashes result from bugs in the actual operating system software, or from buggy apps. Of course, history tells us that we can expect things to calm down as iOS 8 updates are released. Also, in older version devices, it is quite possible that some apps are out of date because the user has not updated them - or, because the developer has abandoned the app and there just won't be any new updates.

On the plus side, the actual crash rate of 3.57 isn't too terrible a number and the remedy usually only requires a quick reboot to mend. In the meantime (at least until Apple releases an iOS 8 update), make sure to update all of your apps. That should take care of at least part of the trouble.

But I'm also hearing about more concerning problems with the new iOS 8 update.

iOS 8 users complain about sluggish Wi-Fi and battery life

Not only do new users risk more frequent crashes with iOS 8, it seems they run out of juice more quickly because of new battery issues. And if that weren't enough, early reports also mention slower Wi-Fi that randomly drops connectivity.

In some ways, the battery issue is sort of comical because the new operating system actually includes features that tell you which apps are your biggest battery users. How about YOU are your biggest battery drain, iOS 8?

So how bad does this really all sound? Well, there are no official statistics, but Twitter has been buzzing with complaints.

For the time being, it seems that the Wi-Fi issue is more sporadic and will probably be fixed with the next update. But, the battery issue could be a bit more trying - particularly with how inconvenient it can be to drag an extra charger with you (and find places to plug it in).

So, beyond trading your device for a new iPhone 6 or 6 Plus which seem nearly immune to these problems - (you have to wonder if the Wi-Fi and battery issues were engineered by Apple as a "buy new" nudge) - there are some tricks you should learn to maximize your battery life until your next iPhone upgrade.

Ways to preserve your battery

Just because the new iOS 8 operating system is draining your batter faster than you are accustomed to, there are ways to improve its performance. Here are the very best ways to extend your battery life:

  • Identify your problem apps - The battery suck that is iOS 8 actually has a built-in feature that can help you. Go to Settings>>General>>Usage>>Battery Usage. There you will find a list of the apps that are the biggest drains. If you don't use them, just shut them down.
  • Remove Parallax - If you don't know what it is, it is simply the effect that has your icons "floating" above your background. Sure, it is cool, but it is also unnecessary (and a notorious battery waster). To turn it off, go to Settings>>General>>Accessibility and then set Reduce Motion to "On."
  • Drop AirDrop and Bluetooth - Now if your AirDrop or Bluetooth features are important to you, leave them on. But, if you are not using them for anything, shut 'em down. Just swipe up your Control Center and hit the toggle.
  • Put an end to the endless Wi-Fi search - Again, if the search for Wi-Fi is incredibly important to you, keep it, and focus on other battery-saving remedies. In most cases though, there is no point to have your phone searching (and using battery life) when there's not trusted network in sight. Turn off Wi-Fi from the Control Center when you leave your house. Or even better, go to Settings>>Wi-Fi and turn Ask to Join Networks to off. Once you have, your phone will hop on Wi-Fi networks it already knows but won't search for any new ones (unless you tell it to).
  • Disable auto-brightness - In most cases, this feature keeps you far brighter than you need to be. So, shut it off, whydontcha? Go to Settings>>Display & Brightness and flip the toggle. Drop that backlight down. And if you do step outside, just use the Control Center like they did in the "olden days" - that's actually what it's for.
  • Treat your battery right - Beyond making adjustments to your device, there are some other ways to improve battery performance. Here are a few tips that can help improve battery life outside your device:
    1. Fill 'er up - Remember the battery inside your device is rechargeable. Charging your battery to capacity once a month and then "near" capacity in between, helps to "train it" to maximize its full capacity without over doing it.
    2. Stay cool - A battery's life and performance is affected negatively by heat. When you're not using it, try to keep it in a cool place.
    3. Don't go wireless - Wireless charging is definitely cool, but it also has a nasty habit of broiling your battery with "waste heat." In a pinch, sure. But I wouldn't recommend using one often.
    4. Zero is too low - I generally tell people not to dip below 40 percent as a rule. But that's just to keep your battery in tip top shape. But to avoid any real mishaps or damage, never let your battery go all the way down to zero. That can cause more serious problems.

OK, so we know that iOS 8 has a few hiccups. Then again, when has there been an operating system that hasn't? If you haven't downloaded it yet, you may want to hold off until the first update is available (which usually fixes most of the glitches). Or, if you have, don't be too discouraged, after all, there are tons of great new features to enjoy.

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