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The most expensive eBay auctions ever

#11 - Nintendo video game

Starting at number 11 on the list is an old Nintendo cartridge that sold for almost $100,000. Nintendo gave away these super-rare cartridges to winners and finalists at the 1990 Nintendo World Championships. In January, one of these cartridges sold for $99,902. It was originally listed for $5,500.

nintendo championship cartridge

Image courtesy of eBay seller muresan.

#10 - "Grease" hot rod

Number 10 on the highest bids list is the 1949 hot rod that raced Greased Lightning in the hit musical "Grease." A California seller had found the old car and restored the shell, giving it a custom paint job and rebuilding the engine. It sold on eBay for a final price of $180,100. That's more than two Tesla electric sports cars!

Hell's Chariot Grease hot rod

Image courtesy of Mathias Ebeling / Auto Blog.

#9 - 715th home run baseball from Barry Bonds

EBay item number nine is from the San Francisco Giants' own Barry Bonds, who is has the most career home runs in Major League Baseball history. His 715th home run ball sold for $220,100 back in 2006. That is one big sports fan.

barry bonds

Image courtesy of Wikimedia/ Wikipedia Commons.

#8 - Original Hollywoodland sign

After the original "Hollywoodland" sign was taken down, the Hollywood Chamber of Commerce sold the sign to a nightclub owner named Hank Berger for about $10,000. Berger turned around and sold the sign to a collector for unknown "six-figure sum" in 2003. The collector, Dan Bliss, then put the sign up on eBay in 2005, where it sold for a cool $450,400.

hollywood sign

Image courtesy of Wikimedia/ Wikipedia Commons.
Next page:  What could possibly be more expensive than the original "Hollywoodland" sign?
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