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Whoa. New solid-state batteries could last twice as long

Whoa. New solid-state batteries could last twice as long
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If you remember anything from this article, this is what you need to know: Solid state, in the computing world, is a code word for "better." I've already covered how much faster your computer can run with a solid-state drive, but the latest innovation about to hit the consumer market is solid-state batteries.

While solid-state batteries have been available to professional-grade markets for a while, the tools to start building consumer-grade batteries are finally ready. Applied Materials claims that it can provide companies with the tools they need to develop long-lasting solid-state batteries for much cheaper than the current cost.

Here's how these batteries will work, according to the MIT Technology Review:

In solid-state batteries the liquid electrolytes normally used in conventional lithium-ion batteries are replaced with solid ones, which makes it possible to replace conventional electrodes with lithium metal ones that hold far more energy.

The other difference between solid-state batteries and your run-of-the-mill AA is that solid-state batteries don't require a liquid electrolyte. Liquid electrolytes are a huge limitation on the shape and size of a battery. Solid-state batteries could fit in more places without any shape requirements.

Not only that, but the MIT Technology Review believes that solid-state batteries will be safer, too.

Doing away with the liquid electrolyte, which is flammable, can also improve the safety of batteries, which leads to cost and size savings, particularly in electric vehicles, by reducing the need for complex cooling systems.

You shouldn't expect to see these solid-state batteries on the same shelf as your run-of-the-mill Duracell any time soon. This, like my coverage of future tech, is a look at what to expect from the future. Get excited.

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