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Why are people dousing themselves with ice water on your Facebook feed?

Why are people dousing themselves with ice water on  your Facebook feed?
photo courtesy of shutterstock

If you're like me, you've been confused by a bunch of photos and videos of people pouring ice water on themselves all over your Facebook page. This seems like one of the weirdest social media trends in a while, but it's actually inspired by a really good cause.

No one is sure exactly when the ice shower trend started, but it began showing up in Internet reports around June as a way to get people to donate to charities for a bunch of different causes. So, how does it work?

To participate, get a bucket-full of ice water and pour it on your head while wearing regular clothing. Then, with the icy water still trickling down your back, nominate friends to take the same challenge. If they’re too chicken, the friends can donate some amount of money to a charity. Otherwise, the cycle repeats, and each nominates three more friends to take the challenge. Of course, the entire challenge should be filmed and posted to your social media platform of choice.

Water Bucket Challenge in Boston

The Twitter post from @SanjaySalomon says: "And it's dunking time! Way to go @BostonDotCom #icebucketchallenge"

The trend really took off with some professional golfers, who used it to raise money for charities they support. It's also getting really popular in Boston, where some former college baseball players are raising awareness for former teammate Pete Frates, who has ALS.

The Boston movement has gotten some pretty big names involved. Former Boston College quarterback and current NFL player Matt Ryan, Mayor Marty Walsh, and many other local sports stars and celebrities have poured ice water on themselves for the cause.

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Source: Boston.com
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