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Your browser could be draining your laptop's battery

Your browser could be draining your laptop's battery
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Windows users watch out! Your choice of Internet browser could be sucking away your battery life and slowing down your computer.

It turns out Google Chrome changes settings internally in your Windows computer that drain your battery and slow down processing. It does this by increasing the "system clock tick rate" from 15.625ms to 1.000ms.

What is a clock tick anyway, and why does it matter? In an OS like Windows, events are often set to run at intervals. To save power, the processor sleeps when nothing needs attention, and wakes at predefined intervals. This interval is what Chrome adjusts in Windows, so reducing it to 1.000ms means that the system is waking far more often than at 15.625ms. In fact, at 1.000ms the processor is waking 1,000 times per second. The default, of 15.625ms means the processor wakes just 64 times per second to check on events that need attention.

This means that anytime your Google Chrome browser is open, your computer could run slower and use the battery much quicker. Other browsers like Internet Explorer and Firefox don't have this problem because they only adjust the tick rate when needed, like when you're watching videos on YouTube.

Mac and Linux users also don't have to worry because their computers use a different technology called "tickless timers."

The problem has actually been around for awhile now, but Google knows about it.

Chrome is a great browser for security and functionality, but you might want to find an alternative until a fix is found to avoid battery drain and slow performance. Firefox and Opera are two great choices that I recommend.

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Source: Forbes
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