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Government agencies have 'secret wires' connected to cell networks

Government agencies have 'secret wires' connected to cell networks
360b / Shutterstock.com

Even though Edward Snowden first made allegations against the U. S. government of spying on American citizens a year ago, his revelations are still making shockwaves.

Snowden unveiled that the government was strong-arming companies like Google to hand over information about their users, but it didn't stop with Web companies. The government was also dipping into the telecommunications cookie jar.

The whistle has been blown by major telecom company, Vodafone, which operates in 29 countries around the globe.

"The company said wires had been connected directly to its network and those of other telecoms groups, allowing agencies to listen to or record live conversations and, in certain cases, track the whereabouts of a customer."

Vodafone also published its first Law Enforcement Disclosure Report to fight back against increasing pressure from governments around the world to use public companies to spy on their own citizens. You can see the Law Enforcement Disclosure Report here.

Now Vodafone has stepped up and revealed to the public, as much as it can, about which governments have been wiretapping and intercepting phone calls and text messages.

"In about six of the countries in which Vodafone operates, the law either obliges telecoms operators to install direct access pipes, or allows governments to do so. The company, which owns mobile and fixed broadband networks, including the former Cable & Wireless business, has not named the countries involved because certain regimes could retaliate by imprisoning its staff."

The visual breakdown below is courtesy of The Guardian. Vodafone_web_Update_060614

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