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'Right to be forgotten' unlikely to take hold in U.S.

'Right to be forgotten' unlikely to take hold in U.S.
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A European court has ruled that the "right to be forgotten" exists. But don't expect that right to exist in America.

The ruling, which could force Google to scrub search results that might be old or embarrassing to somebody, runs contrary to the First Amendment, a lawyer says.

“Under U.S. law, Google enjoys quite a bit of leeway as to what it can choose to take down or leave up,” said Evan Brown, an Internet and technology lawyer in the Chicago office of InfoLawGroup.

Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act shields Internet service providers and search engines from lawsuits over content. If somebody writes or records something considered defamatory or otherwise illegal, Google and other search engines are protected against lawsuits over any links that may show up in search results.

Without the legal shield of Section 230, says Brown, online companies in the early years of the Internet would have found it much harder to attract private investment.

There are other ways to delete yourself from the Internet. Click here to find out how.

Do you think there should be a "right to be forgotten" in the U.S.? Let me know below.

 

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