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How to photograph the solar eclipse 2017

How to photograph the solar eclipse 2017
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You have never seen anything like this. For the first time in 99 years, a total eclipse of the sun will pass over the entire United States.

On the morning of August 21, the sun will go dark. The result will be spectacular. Solar eclipses have fascinated people for millennia, and with good reason. The bright daytime sky will suddenly turn black. Stars and planets will appear overhead.

A black shadow will cover the sun. Its brilliant light will become a thin, shimmering sliver. Note: You can look directly at the solar eclipse during totality when it's completely blocked by the moon. But be extremely careful. Keep reading for tips to keep your eyes safe.

Of course, you'll want to document this rare event. However, if you just grab your phone, point and shoot, the result will not even come close to doing the eclipse justice. Try this: Take a picture of the moon tonight. If it looks big and bright in the sky, it will most likely look like a disappointing tiny dot in your pictures.

Why? You need the correct lens to capture something as far away as the moon, the sun and solar eclipse 2017. So, here's how to stay safe, what you need to buy ahead of time, and how to take great photos. (Find out how you can fly around the moon.)

Note: Solar eclipse 2017 will be seen in totality in only a thin, 70-mile-wide strip from Oregon to South Carolina. The rest of the country will see a partial eclipse, which is dangerous to your eyes.

Next page: Protect your eyes
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