Frequently Asked Questions

Click on the questions below to see the answer.

What items should I include in my care package?

I am always asking the troops what they need and the list continually changes. For example, during the spring and summer months, avoid sending chocolate or anything that could melt in the scorching temperatures. The most popular personal items are baby wipes, hand sanitizer, body wash, shampoo, toothpaste / toothbrush and lip balm. Salty snacks like sunflower seeds, jerky, pretzels and nuts in snack size bags are very popular this time of the year to replace the salt they lose sweating. No home baked goodies are allowed. Send food in the manufacturer’s original packaging only. Cushion the box very well so items won't shift or move.

And remember: Always include a note letting them know a little about you and how much you appreciate all they do. See a complete list of what to send here, visit my send a package page.

Please do not send money.

How do you recommend I ship my package?

The best way is Priority Mail through the U.S. Postal Service. It offers a special Military Care Kit, or "Mili-kit," with free boxes and labels. There is no weight limit so put as much in as fits (without overstuffing the box) and pay one flat fee to ship! I have listed resources for you on my send a package page.

What address do I put on my mailing label?

Currently, I am asking that you address your care package for our troops to one of the soldiers on my Send a Package page.

Please Note: Check back to this page prior to addressing and mailing your packages, as it may change as troops are rotated, transferred, drawn down or re-deployed.

Do you have any other shipping addresses?

I understand your eagerness to participate in Operation Komando. It's a wonderful thing to do for the men and women protecting our freedom. I am always eager to establish new contacts overseas to expand our program. My staff and I are currently working on arrangements for additional mailing addresses. For updates, you can listen to my show, subscribe to my email newsletters or bookmark this site to get updates about Operation Komando.

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How long will it take for my package to arrive?

That depends. If your box is labeled correctly and accepted, the Department of Defense estimates mail transit time to Afghanistan to be from 7 to almost 14 days.

Here's how the U.S. Postal Service explains delivery:

"Transit times will vary depending on operational conditions and the unit of the addressee. Those in established bases should continue to receive regular service, while those in forward areas or engaged in operations may experience longer arrival times due to logistical constraints."

Will I hear back from the troops after they receive their package?

You may or may not get a "thank you" note. Our military men and women are in a combat zone and may be out on a mission. Be patient and know your thanks comes from them protecting your freedom.

What else can I do?

Operation Komando, in the most simplest of terms, helps connect people with soldiers abroad. I encourage you to speak with neighbors, friends, family and others in your community to find the name and address of other soldiers you can send a care package to. Information on obtaining a MilKit and safe packing and shipping instructions can be obtained on the Send a Package page.

I would also encourage you to spread the word using social media. You can use the Spread the Word page to post to Twitter, "Like" Operation Komando on Facebook, recommend us to your Google Plus network, or just use the "old fashion" social media, and email a link to your network.

How can I get a troop listed?

Click here to send an email to support@komando.com and include:

  • a specific soldier's name to receive the packages
  • the troop's mailing address (this is where packages are going to be sent)
  • where the troop is stationed
  • how long the troop will be stationed there
  • a photo of the unit (we'll proudly post it to our photos page!)

That's it! Thank you for helping support our troops!