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Is this website really CNN? This scam is fooling thousands of consumers

Is this website really CNN? This scam is fooling thousands of consumers
© Carlosbcna | Dreamstime.com

You've heard this before, but we'll say it again: You can't believe everything you read on the internet. Unfortunately, not everyone out there is trying to keep you informed of scams to protect you like we are.

One of the latest hoaxes making the rounds is a fake ad claiming to be from CNN Nutrition. But, if you look closely, there are some red flags that give it away.

The article states that a college student from Cornell University was able to lose 37 pounds within a month by sticking to a special diet of apple cider vinegar and a supplement called Garcinia. To make the story seem even more convincing, the student "Amanda Haughman" was interviewed and quoted.

"I had struggled with my weight my whole life," the article stated, and the quote went on to describe details of the diets Ms. Haughman tested. However, every word of the quote, as well as the article itself is a work of fiction. Amanda Haughman isn't real, and neither are the claims made by the article.

How the scam works

Although this phony post doesn't appear to be hiding anything malicious like malware, it is written in a way that's designed to trick consumers into buying a product. And a potentially harmful product at that.

According to health experts, taking Garcinia as a weight loss supplement can result in some serious side effects. In fact, back in 2009, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued a warning about the product, explaining it can lead to significant liver problems.

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